The Forbidden Phrase Part 2


 

This post is part 2 in a series on sales techniques.  Click here to read part 1.

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So now we understand that customers are defensive and resistant to contact upon entering the retail store. How do we break that paradigm and get the customers to see us as a necessary and helpful assistant in what is a difficult decision making process?

First of all, we must understand that sales at any level is equal parts “science” and “art”.  Al most anyone can learn the science but the art is individual and is not as much learned as it is instinctive: hence the expression “he/she is a born salesperson”

As a salesperson you will be called upon at any given time to be a psychiatrist, an actor, an artist or technician.

The science of the initial contract is:

  1. Be busy, have something in your hand, appear to be going somewhere or engaged in a task. This makes you non-threatening to the customer. Never congregate with other salespeople or stand around the sales counter, etc.
  2. Never approach a customer from directly in front; people are protective of the space in front of them and even at a distance this is threatening.
  3. Catch their eye, smile, look away and go back to what you were doing. After a two count, say “Excuse me, may I ask you a question?” If you do this right, they will respond by meeting your eyes, and in some cases even taking a step toward you. From their perspective they are now meeting you for the SECOND time and your threat level has lowered. You must have a question ready that:
    1. Does not relate to business!
    2. Is open ended and cannot be easily answered by “yes or “no”
    3. Something as simple as “Is it still raining outside” can work, but it is better to be creative so try and ask something about them, maybe about their logo-ed clothing or a hat they are wearing. i.e.” I just love that jacket/ring/hat/shoes would you mind telling me where you found that”

Done correctly this is so powerful that you will find yourself in a conversation with a new friend, and that conversation has nothing to do with business.

Now the artistry kicks in: the “Smoozing”, or small talk, can take just a few seconds or much longer depending on the customer’s level of defensiveness. Remember to listen carefully if a customer talks about themselves. Repeating a personal detail back to them sometime later in the sale proves that you listened. i.e. “When your daughter gets home next week, she will love this” and goes a long way in building confidence.

With this as your foundation, most customers will make the transition to business without help, which is a “buying signal” in itself. If the customer is slow to make the transition, the salesperson needs to judge when the time is right.

Strangely enough you have now earned the right to ask, AS A NEW FRIEND (not a salesperson), what brings them into your store. Their response will be much more positive if you have done your job, lowered their defences and earned the right to ask the question.

From here we would follow the “railroad track” of a sale:

  1. Probing or qualifying
  2. Demonstration
  3. Trial close
  4. Handling objections
  5. Closing the sale
  6. Adding on
  7. Confirmations and invitations.

Constructing a sales process is critical for success; arguably the first step that I have spent so much time explaining here is the most important. Without a solid foundation of trust and confidence between you and your customer, it will make the whole process more difficult and frustrating for both of you.

 

What sales techniques do you find effective?  As a customer, what kind of approach do you appreciate?

 

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Thanks for reading!  For information on cellular point of sale, visit our website: mmspos.com

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Posted on September 25, 2012, in 'We Get Retail' Business Tips, Consumer Psychology Files and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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